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Thursday, May 24, 2012

Book Reco: A Fine Balance



A few readers of this blog suggested that I recommend books that I find interesting / inspiring / useful or all of these.

In my first book reco, I will review
Rohinton Mistry's A Fine Balance. I have read all of Mistry's works, like Such a Long Journey, Family Matters, and Tales from Firozsha Baag

Mistry was born in India in 1952 but emigrated to Canada in 1975. A recipient of several international awards, he recently was bestowed with the prestigious 
Neustadt International Prize for Literature (for 2012).

A Fine Balance is Mistry's best work. Rarely have I come across a work which deals in with a myriad of human emotions with such profound intensity and care. Mistry writes of a India in chaos 
— of a country that is caught in the maelstrom of political emergency, social decadence, and economic deprivation.

The story revolves around the lives and travails of four characters: Dina, a Parsi widow, Maneck, a student, and the uncle-nephew tailor duo of Om and Ishvar. The story, set in the politically charged atmosphere of the 1970s, enthralls us with the varied emotions that colour every aspect of the lives of these four characters.


As an Indian,I could easily identify with each of Mistry's characters. I think Mistry's characters are universal 
— for emotions like happiness and suffering, love and hate, trust and betrayal, success and failure are universal. 

Mistry has hewn his characters not just with words but with soul and I think that is the biggest asset of this work. Go ahead and invest in this work; I say invest because the returns by way of happiness will be life-long. 


After reading this work, I am sure you would agree with me that Rohinton Mistry is a
master at work.



2 comments:

Rohith castelino said...

Congs on your first book reco, Thank you so much, you are creative in your blog writing

Anonymous said...

Read the book after I read your blog entry.It's grim book and makes you cringe so many time but devastatingly amazing. Rohinton mistry surely is a master at work.